And Now A Word From Our Seniors

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And Now A Word From Our Seniors

Graduation is bittersweet. It is a time for celebration and reflection, and the journalism classes at Brashier are perfect places for both (Photo courtesy of Pixabay, photo credits to McElspeth).

Graduation is bittersweet. It is a time for celebration and reflection, and the journalism classes at Brashier are perfect places for both (Photo courtesy of Pixabay, photo credits to McElspeth).

Photo courtesy of Pixabay, photo credits to McElspeth

Graduation is bittersweet. It is a time for celebration and reflection, and the journalism classes at Brashier are perfect places for both (Photo courtesy of Pixabay, photo credits to McElspeth).

Photo courtesy of Pixabay, photo credits to McElspeth

Photo courtesy of Pixabay, photo credits to McElspeth

Graduation is bittersweet. It is a time for celebration and reflection, and the journalism classes at Brashier are perfect places for both (Photo courtesy of Pixabay, photo credits to McElspeth).

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Every year, a sad day comes: a day of saying goodbye to the seniors who have coordinated and created our student publications. Whether it is in the Yearbook class or the Newspaper class, the seniors have helped to organize and channel the creative processes that go into the respective product. Unfortunately, a day comes where these seniors leave. Luckily, at this point they are ready to enter the world with the newfound wisdom they have acquired.

“I feel like I have grown a lot [in the past four years], not just in my academic life, but in my personal life. I’ve become the person that I want to be; I found who I wanted to be. You have to have ambition to be successful,” said senior, and veteran reporter of the Bengal Beat, Ashlyn Athey.

Personal growth is monumental and acts as a true testament to how the year went, but another important part of high school is the bonds that are created with others.

“Over the last four years I have learned so many valuable lessons and made amazing friendships. I realized a great deal about myself and I honestly think I grew immensely so much as a person. I also really enjoyed being more involved in the school, and getting to know new people. There’s an amazing feeling in knowing I played a role in the creation of our published book,” said senior, and veteran Yearbook staff member, Eva Purcell.

Although reflecting upon the contributions made is important, some realized why high school was an important time to them in a more simple sense, which is an impressive feat.

“I spent four years working through stress until I realized that I didn’t need to be stressed,” said senior, and editor of the Bengal Beat, Jasmyne Michaels.

Regarding journalism at Brashier, the seniors are usually given more responsibilities, such as editing or managing digital platforms; as a result they have to adapt to their new surroundings.

“I love Yearbook; it’s like my mini-family. I have learned to delegate, to lead, to work with people better. I have gotten better with getting out of my bubble. I was really shy before, but Yearbook got me out of that shell.” said senior, and editor of the Brashier Yearbook, Julia Goulet.

For some of the seniors, the experience has been less than easy, but they have worked diligently through it.

“I wasn’t expecting to be on Newspaper and it has been, as cliche as it is, a rollercoaster. I went from reporter to editor in a year, and I got the work that comes with it. The people in class are crazy, but fun. I’ve learned a lot that I’m going to take into life—not just into college,” said Michaels.

Even having similar challenges and difficulties, the intrinsic value of class can be different. This difference is not bad, but brings up an interesting point: there’s truly something for everyone in journalism.

“I feel like Newspaper has been my creative outlet, especially throughout senior year. I have done a lot of research documents and product development, but Newspaper has given me a chance to express myself and discuss the opinions of the people around me,” said Athey.

The simple lesson that Brashier teaches its students is different for everyone, but it has a common trait associated with it: ambition.

“Yearbook taught me that you have to go and [pursue your goal]—even if [the process] is not something that you want to do,” said Poindexter.

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