The Renaissance Woman

Jones+makes+a+compelling+argument+that+the+Jack+of+all+trades%2C+master+of+none%2C+is+oftentimes+better+than+the+master+of+one+%28Photo+courtesy+of+Ryan+Jones%2C+permission+for+use+granted+by+Kylee+Jones%29.
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The Renaissance Woman

Jones makes a compelling argument that the Jack of all trades, master of none, is oftentimes better than the master of one (Photo courtesy of Ryan Jones, permission for use granted by Kylee Jones).

Jones makes a compelling argument that the Jack of all trades, master of none, is oftentimes better than the master of one (Photo courtesy of Ryan Jones, permission for use granted by Kylee Jones).

Ryan Jones

Jones makes a compelling argument that the Jack of all trades, master of none, is oftentimes better than the master of one (Photo courtesy of Ryan Jones, permission for use granted by Kylee Jones).

Ryan Jones

Ryan Jones

Jones makes a compelling argument that the Jack of all trades, master of none, is oftentimes better than the master of one (Photo courtesy of Ryan Jones, permission for use granted by Kylee Jones).

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New hobbies are a great way to broaden horizons and spend time. Learning or practicing something constructive is what many claim is a key aspect of a healthy lifestyle, but few people have more than a handful of hobbies. Fewer still have the time and dedication to practice nearly ten different things, while also balancing classes, but one girl seeks to be an example of this kind of student.

“My hobbies include photography, painting, piano, violin, organ, cello, music composition, reading, baking, and theatre. I have a passion for learning, and teaching too; I think it’s fascinating to learn new things and grow your skills! For as long as I can remember I have done this. Since before kindergarten my mom said I would just sit down and ask her to teach me things and then work on them until I understood,” said junior Kylee Jones.

With the hobbies she has learned in life already, Kylee is quite possibly the epitome of the modern renaissance woman. However, like Da Vinci who is widely known for his paintings, Jones is definitely known for her dedication to music, specifically the piano.

“I started learning piano in third grade. I always had an interest in music and loved hearing the songs played at church. I really just thought it was something new to learn that I could eventually use to uplift others. I’ve done quite a few recitals since third grade. I play occasionally in church, but mainly play organ prelude for the whole congregation. Once I got really into piano I wanted to learn every instrument I possibly could,” said Jones.

Although not currently playing for a specific orchestra, Jones has also made great strides as a violinist for many different organizations. Her hard work in this area has definitely paid off as she has performed on numerous different occasions.

“When I initially began playing in middle school it was exciting, but also fairly daunting. A new instrument brings new challenges and obstacles, but also new rewards and skills. It was actually in orchestra that I found my best friends who I was able to perform with in concerts, [at] schools, and even [at] a teachers conference held in Myrtle Beach. After moving on to high school, I had the opportunity to participate in GCYO which allowed me to play more advanced music with higher performing orchestras. My final concert at the Peace Center was absolutely incredible and truly rewarding for all the work put in throughout the years. I actually had to stop playing in an orchestra due to time, but I still play for recreation and with others I know for special performances,” said Jones.

Aside from music, Jones’s other passion is visual arts. She paints, sketches, or photographs whatever she pleases, and as a result has also become strong in these areas.

“I mainly paint landscape and inspirational paintings. I hope to learn more about painting people. My mom is an artist and always fueled my creative side so I’ve always painted and drawn. Eventually, I started moving from canvas to camera and thought it would be exciting to explore photography. I got my first camera in ninth grade and have been shadowing two professional photographers ever since to learn new tips and tricks. I love to go into the woods and take photos of nature and my siblings as well as take photos in yearbook,” said Jones.

Not only does she do this outside of school, but Jones has also been given opportunities to expand her experience and to share that experience with others who have similar passions.

“Aside from short-lived orchestra club, being at Brashier hasn’t helped in music. However, art club and yearbook have dramatically helped me grow in visual arts. I’ve been able to set aside time to use different tools and techniques to further my skills and learn from others,” said Jones.

Learning from others is important in order to grow, but first one must take an initial step to get outside of his or her comfort zone. This can often be daunting as it was for Jones, but she advises anyone who tries to push forward.

“To anyone looking to try something new, I would say to never doubt yourself and don’t give up at the beginning because it seems hard. Most times the things that require the most, reward us the most. Learn everything you can and go as far as you can. New challenges bring new obstacles, but also new skills and build character,” said Jones.

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