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Why You Should Pursue Minimalism

Oftentimes%2C+this+is+how+minimalism+is+depicted%2C+but+its+true+meaning+is+far+deeper+than+how+it+appears.+%28Photo+by+Pexels%29
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Why You Should Pursue Minimalism

Oftentimes, this is how minimalism is depicted, but its true meaning is far deeper than how it appears. (Photo by Pexels)

Oftentimes, this is how minimalism is depicted, but its true meaning is far deeper than how it appears. (Photo by Pexels)

Oftentimes, this is how minimalism is depicted, but its true meaning is far deeper than how it appears. (Photo by Pexels)

Oftentimes, this is how minimalism is depicted, but its true meaning is far deeper than how it appears. (Photo by Pexels)

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You may have heard of the term minimalism, but never really understood what it means. Over the past few years, people have been adapting to a lifestyle of minimalism. To some, this looks like a life only consisting of the utmost basics. However, minimalism is truly more than a lifestyle; rather, it’s an ideal. Minimalism encourages one’s focus to avert from materialism, thus bringing not only financial upliftment, but also, most importantly, intentionality and gratitude.

Look at your closet. How many of those clothes do you really wear? For most of us, we only wear 44 percent of our wardrobes, which means that we purchase double the amount of clothing we wear regularly. Even worse, the hyper-consumerism that has developed in America has resulted in a whopping $1.2 trillion being wasted on nonessential goods. Often, we don’t really think much about what we’re buying, and when we do, it’s usually about the price. Though this may be a good indication of consumer awareness, the real problem lies with the intent: why are you really purchasing that discounted shirt? Is it because you need it, or because it’s cheap? We fall into these inevitable traps, and our excessive purchases add onto the $1.2 trillion. With minimalism, we can develop a heightened sense of conscious consumerism– it becomes easier to distinguish needs from wants.

Another way minimalism benefits us is its ability to develop the sense of intentionality. Tangible things, though materialistic, can still have value, whether it be instinctual or personal. As Joshua Becker from Becoming Minimalist states, “Minimalism is the intentional promotion of the things we [value most] and the removal of everything that distracts us from it. It is a life that forces intentionality.” If we are able to know whether our purchases will bring value into our lives or not, it will help us to define what is truly important and what is excessive.

In our society, we are often overwhelmed by the new products that are constantly coming out; it seems as if every month there is a new type of gadgetry better than its last version or a new clothing trend in style. To instill the concept of minimalism in one’s life is to also develop one’s sense of contentment and gratitude. It brings us to the realization that, compared to the rest of the world, we are far more fortunate to have just the most basic necessities needed in order to survive. It brings a second voice into the debate of whether or not to purchase the latest iPhone, exclaiming that your phone works just fine and that you do not need a new phone. This brings you to the realization of how fortunate you are to have a mobile device that can do so much with just a tap of a finger. Gratitude, therefore, stems from minimalism and grows into an endless trail of thanksgiving.

Though some may say that it is impossible for them to be minimalists due to a lack of commitment or inability to handle such a drastic change in one’s life, it is all a matter of what minimalism truly is: developing and promoting the value of things that are necessary in our lives and removing ones that don’t contribute to the same purpose. You don’t have to throw away every single thing you own. Finding value in what you have and recognizing the difference between what you really need versus what you want is minimalism at its core.

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