BMC News

Filed under News, Recent Stories

Denuclearizing North Korea

Negotiating+a+peace+agreement+with+North+Korea+could+not+only+benefit+the+U.S.+but+also+South+Korea.+%0A%28Photo+Credit%3A+Geralt+on+Pixabay%29%0A%0A%0A
Negotiating a peace agreement with North Korea could not only benefit the U.S. but also South Korea. 
(Photo Credit: Geralt on Pixabay)

Negotiating a peace agreement with North Korea could not only benefit the U.S. but also South Korea. (Photo Credit: Geralt on Pixabay)

Negotiating a peace agreement with North Korea could not only benefit the U.S. but also South Korea. (Photo Credit: Geralt on Pixabay)

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






For decades, the United States and North Korea have had conflicting views over certain issues. However, things may be looking up concerning their relationship. In the past few months, the U.S. and North Korea have been negotiating plans for peace, starting with the denuclearization of North Korea. North Korea is very proud of their nuclear accomplishments, having launched five nuclear tests since 2006, so the requirement of ending its nuclear program may be a deal breaker. However, according to President Donald Trump, Kim Jong-Un has already decided to suspend his nuclear program and intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) testing. This sudden decision is making some begin to question if Trump and Jong-Un’s interpretations of denuclearization are really the same.

“I believe North Korea’s denuclearization for good is debatable. Since Kim Jong-Un is a tyrant, there is no guarantee that he [would] actually rid the country of nuclear weapons. I think the sudden change of heart, almost in an immediate sense, is a red flag. It seemed like it took him only a day to switch from making nukes to getting rid of them. There is no guarantee that they will denuclearize,” says junior Maggie McNeeley.

So, what exactly does the U.S. want from North Korea? According to Mike Pompeo, the CIA director who has been meeting with Kim Jong-Un, the U.S. wants North Korea to free American prisoners as well as permanently denuclearize. The U.S. and South Korea are working toward an official agreement with North Korea to end tensions caused by the Korean War as well as more recent events.

“I do not know if they [will] come to any specific agreement, but the fact that [President Trump] is able to meet with [Kim Jong-Un] in person is astounding. There is a possibility of an agreement if Kim is willing to meet in the first place, so I am hopeful that a peaceful outcome will occur,” says senior Ian McDowell.

On April 29th, Kim Jong-Un announced that he would shut down Pyongyang’s nuclear-test site by May. According to the Workers’ Party of Korea, the founding and ruling political party of North Korea, the country has already finished their work and research on nuclear weapons and rockets. It has been four months since a missile has been tested; this is significant because North Korea had previously been testing more than two missiles per month. North Korea has stated that the U.S. troops in South Korea will not affect new changes. To North Korea, denuclearization means denuclearizing all of Korea, both North and South. On top of that, North Korea has agreed to release all U.S. prisoners. In return, North Korea is asking for an increase in the security of its regime.

“North Korea says it will consider denuclearizing…in exchange for a U.S. promise not to invade, [which] would bring stabilization to both Koreas. North Korea is desperate for foreign currency. At current rates, North Korea will run out of money before the end of the year due to stricter enforcement of trade sanctions by President Trump’s administration. Sources tell me that [Kim Jong-Un] will demand that sanctions be lifted before he agrees to negotiate. It comes down to a matter of trust and [verification]. North Korea will not agree to full verification,” says history teacher Gene Kennedy.

President Donald Trump and Kim Jong-Un are planning to meet June 12th. For now, only South and North Korea have been discussing peace. In fact, North Korea has already begun to take steps, such as changing its time zones to South Korea’s time zones, in order to achieve national reconciliation and unity. Even though an official agreement may not be created in the coming months, North Korea’s changes are affecting the world for the better.    

“Although I do not feel as politically knowledgeable as necessary to properly predict any possible outcome between the United States and North Korea, I do feel as if this negotiation is setting a respectful and honorable example to all other countries. I hope for peace and denuclearization as do many others and pray that, if those actions are taken, the world may find a greater reassurance and trust in one another,” says sophomore Kylee Jones.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

BMCN intends for this area to be used to foster healthy, thought-provoking discussion. Comments are expected to adhere to our standards and to be respectful and constructive. Comments are reviewed and must be approved by a moderator to ensure that they meet these standards.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    Featured Multimedia

    Speed Dating At Brashier

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    News

    Cape Town: Running Out of Time and Water

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    News

    Change in PyeongChang

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    BMC Students

    Colleges, Careers, and the World of Adulthood

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    BMC Students

    “Be Kind and Good and Respectful”

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    BMC Students

    Herff Jones and Expensive Stones

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    Recent Stories

    Remembering the First World War

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    Feature Page

    Forever Young

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    Halloween

    Road Kill

  • Denuclearizing North Korea

    Halloween

    Behind a Screen

Brashier Middle College Charter High School News....written and created by students, for students
Denuclearizing North Korea