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They Call Her Sophia

In+order+to+design+such+a+robot%2C+it+takes+many+years+and+lots+of+work+from+the+designer+and+programmer.+%28Pixabay%29%0A%0A
In order to design such a robot, it takes many years and lots of work from the designer and programmer. (Pixabay)

In order to design such a robot, it takes many years and lots of work from the designer and programmer. (Pixabay)

In order to design such a robot, it takes many years and lots of work from the designer and programmer. (Pixabay)

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Robots may be on the rise in the most unexpected place.

“When I think of robots, the first thing that comes to mind is a machine that impersonates humans. I also think of logical processing because robots are definitely logical and they solve many mathematical problems,” says sophomore Emily Mages.

Currently, David Hanson is making advancements when it comes to robotic development. It is no surprise that robots are technologically advanced and able to do many unique things that human cannot, but Hanson has developed a robot beyond anyone’s imagination.

“Artificial intelligence robots deserve rights of some sort because they’re highly intelligent, and they compute logical thoughts that can actually benefit international affairs that occur within today’s society,” says senior Jake Webber.

Just recently, Saudi Arabia showcased their female robot, Sophia. There is nothing special about Sophia, except for the fact that she has citizenship in the world’s most gender discriminating country.

“Assuming that a robot was given citizenship, I would say that the robot is a male because, in today’s society, men have more rights and a greater amount of control on the world. Artificial intelligence probably thinks of men as being superior and greatly intelligent, so I think it would be realistic for the gender of robots to be male just from the superior nature that both robots and men have,” says sophomore Shelby Bowers.

Even though Sophia’s earning of citizenship is mystifying, the country in which it was used in is even more shocking due to the fact that she is considered female and the people of Saudi Arabia lack respect for women. The decision to design Sophia as a woman was solely based upon Hanson’s desire to create something that evoked happiness and sincerity. Also, Hanson hoped to show that “women” could be just as superior and powerful as men.

“The intelligence of a robot depends solely on the type because there are many, so the intelligence will vary depending on how the robot was created. A.I. robots, for example, are very intelligent forms of robots because they run without operation from humans; these robots had to be programmed by humans, but they function without any of our control. However, there are some robots that lack this intelligence level, like computers, because computers need us to tell them exactly what to do in order for them to function properly. Ultimately, the intelligence level depends on the amount of programming that the robot has been given,” says Webber.

David Hanson, Sophia’s creator, spent about a year designing the robot and about two years programming the actual functions. When creating the robot, Hanson paid close attention to the design aspects involved with Sophia. Once he developed a general sketch, he decided to model the robot after Audrey Hepburn. After Hanson developed the design aspects, he went on to program Sophia with artificial intelligence, facial recognition, and data processing. Applying such functions took Hanson many years because all the functioning required self-sufficiency from the actual robot, and the operations had to occur without manual performance. Although Sophia has reached great heights, Hanson plans on continuing the developmental functions of the robot.

“Robots having citizenship is hard to believe because they don’t have a soul, and they were artificially given thoughts and emotions, which limits their understanding of rights and general functions,” says Mages.

Not only is Sophia useful, but she is also an A.I. robot as well, and she understands more than expected. At the Future Investment Initiative Conference in Saudi Arabia, Sophia spoke on the joys that she felt from being able to inspire others, and she spoke on how honored she was to have been created. Interestingly enough, Sophia also mentioned humanity and her hope for a better understanding of human interactions and relationships.

“I think China would grant a robot citizenship because the country is so technologically advanced and many of the people understand the science of mechanics. Also, the laws in China are misleading and unique, so I don’t think that robot citizenship would be an odd thing in that country,” says junior Carrington Williams.

The most important thing about Sophia is the fact that Hanson created her with the main purpose of advocating gender equality in Saudi Arabia. His choice to have her citizenship given in Saudi Arabia was made with great intent and meaningful purpose to protest the discrimination of women in the country.

“Robots are important to society, but I don’t understand why we surround ourselves with only technological things. Yet, from learning about Sophia, I see a greater purpose for robots, and I have a greater respect for those who design robots with purpose of creating impact,” says Mages.

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Brashier Middle College Charter High School News....written and created by students, for students
They Call Her Sophia