BMC News

Can I Have Your Affection Please?

A parent of the child victim was the most common abuser in 78.1% of child maltreatment cases. (Courtesy of Unsplash)

A parent of the child victim was the most common abuser in 78.1% of child maltreatment cases. (Courtesy of Unsplash)

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Lately, topics like neglecting children are brought up daily in the news. There is an abundance of cases involving physical, emotional, and mental neglect occurring in the world. This is especially true in the United States.

“I think neglect is making someone feel less or treating someone in an abusive way, sometimes unintentionally, that may be harmful to them physically or mentally,” says junior Ashlie Fortner.

It may surprise people to know the scale of this offense against the well-being of our kids. Of 683,000 reported child maltreatment cases in America, about three quarters of children were neglected.

“I think it’s because people stop caring and also because people don’t think about a lot of other people aside from themselves…[However,] it is possible to neglect people without meaning to,” says senior Josh Whisler.

The technical definition of neglect basically describes the insufficient care of a child’s basic needs. This could range from lack of love and nurturing to the absence of food and health care treatments. Children throughout the country suffer in situations where the parents may be ignorant to their wants and needs.

“Usually, when a child is neglected, obviously there is emotional and mental damage…[P]hysical [damage] could be when a child seems to be eating a lot at school because they’re not being fed at home… Mental, I would say, when a child is struggling in school [or] they never do homework…They’re struggling with grades, [and] maybe they don’t have a guardian or parent at home to help them because they’re neglected,” says senior Robin Conner.

There are many factors that contribute to an adult’s poor parenting. Drug and alcohol abuse, being a previous victim of abuse, mental health issues, lack of support from the community, poverty, stress and depression, or abusive partners could be some of the many reasons for neglect.

“[Abused students might] not be talking much. You can see their personalities change to where they used to smile a lot, [but] they’re no longer smiling…now they’re walking alone. They may not speak to you anymore, to whereas they normally speak to you. They’re tired, fatigued, not sleeping anymore…They cry a lot; they’re standoffish, angry, sometimes they’re mad and may snap at you… If we see physical things or even emotional things, we can call parents and say, ‘You know, we notice that this is going on with such and such, is there anything we can do?’… We can offer some support there, but, if they don’t say anything, we don’t notice anything physical, or the student doesn’t come to tell us anything, then we don’t know,” explains eleventh and twelfth grade guidance counselor Mrs. Greene.

Many people might believe that the kids that are neglected may be experiencing minor problems at school and the neglect is just an over exaggeration of simple issues. However, educators and other people surrounding these children notice the dramatic change of personality in a kid.

“There are a wide variety of symptoms that kids with neglect experience; social anxiety is usually found….Rash behavior, like…a kid who really acts up, is probably just stressed out and he just behaves differently at school. Bullies are typically like that, they take out their anger on other people. Kids who don’t eat, kids who obviously don’t have adequate clothing for school, and it’s pretty obvious on some people, others it’s not as obvious, like the emotional neglect, which is hard to figure out unless you talk to them yourself,” says senior Will Trone.

Some organizations have set a goal to help kids to the best of their abilities with the help of donations. Even though the number of kids that are abused, not counting those who have not been reported, is large, the organizations provide a safe space for kids.

“It depends on what type of neglect it is. We support [neglected children] as far as once we find out what’s going on… We find resources for them: whether it’s food… [or] clothes. Whatever resources they need, we try to provide those resources for them. But as far as going into the home, that’s something we don’t do. We go as far as reporting it to DSS, reporting it to law enforcement if we have to go that route, but other than that… our hands are out of it… Once we call DSS, we file a report. DSS will actually take that report and then go out to find out what’s going on … They’ll get in touch with the parents and then they’ll go from there,” says Mrs. Greene.

In an unhealthy environment with no affection present, where the needs of the child are not prioritized, children develop behaviors that may affect them in the future. They may have a tendency to fall into delinquency and criminal behavior as adults. One of the key components of organizations fighting against this careless treatment of children involves billions of dollars invested for the prevention, counseling, and provisions for these children. Prevent Child Abuse America estimated about $104 billion in the impact of child neglect and abuse in 2007. They are not just fighting for children’s rights, but for their human rights. As their slogan says, “Our children are our nation’s most valuable resource.”

“I would just let them [neglected child] talk about things. They have a lot of things built up inside, and they typically don’t trust anyone; that’s what I’ve learned from them. They kind of just need a friend more than someone trying to meet all their needs. They really just need to know someone cares for them and then, from that point, you can help them,” says Trone.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

BMCN intends for this area to be used to foster healthy, thought-provoking discussion. Comments are expected to adhere to our standards and to be respectful and constructive. Comments are reviewed and must be approved by a moderator to ensure that they meet these standards.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    Featured Multimedia

    Speed Dating At Brashier

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    News

    Cape Town: Running Out of Time and Water

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    News

    Change in PyeongChang

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    BMC Students

    Colleges, Careers, and the World of Adulthood

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    BMC Students

    “Be Kind and Good and Respectful”

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    BMC Students

    Herff Jones and Expensive Stones

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    Recent Stories

    Remembering the First World War

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    Feature Page

    Forever Young

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    Halloween

    Road Kill

  • Can I Have Your Affection Please?

    Halloween

    Behind a Screen

Brashier Middle College Charter High School News....written and created by students, for students
Can I Have Your Affection Please?