The Bengal Beat

Colleges, Careers, and the World of Adulthood

One+of+the+college+sessions+gave+students+the+opportunity+to+learn+more+about+what+it%E2%80%99s+like+being+a+student+athlete.+Quentin+Hall%2C+a+former+football+player+for+Clemson%2C+was+one+of+the+few+representatives+who+shared+his+experiences+%28Photo+by+Angela+Coppola%29.
One of the college sessions gave students the opportunity to learn more about what it’s like being a student athlete. Quentin Hall, a former football player for Clemson, was one of the few representatives who shared his experiences (Photo by Angela Coppola).

One of the college sessions gave students the opportunity to learn more about what it’s like being a student athlete. Quentin Hall, a former football player for Clemson, was one of the few representatives who shared his experiences (Photo by Angela Coppola).

One of the college sessions gave students the opportunity to learn more about what it’s like being a student athlete. Quentin Hall, a former football player for Clemson, was one of the few representatives who shared his experiences (Photo by Angela Coppola).

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As the school rolls into the New Wear, Brashier hosted its first College/Career Day since the school opened. The two-day event was mainly a replacement for the beloved Arts Intercession due to the several circumstances.

“I liked Arts Intercession; I think it was fun… [but] I think that it’s more beneficial to explore careers like health science and engineering,” says senior Jake Weber.

The two days were split, dedicating one day for career exploration and the other for college introductions. Students were given the opportunity to choose which sessions they wish to attend for both days.

“I want to become a doctor, so I chose everything in the medical field… I really took it seriously,” says junior Jenna Oppatt.

The careers included a diverse group of occupations, including fields like medicine, business, and the arts. Though some specifically-preferred careers were unavailable, the sessions did not fail to inform students.

“Although my preferred profession wasn’t listed, I chose the sessions I did out of curiosity, in order to learn something new and interesting,” says sophomore Kylee Jones.

Students were able to learn not only about the careers themselves, but how they can get a head start, and even a better, chance at pursuing an occupation.

“I learned that you should start off now [because], to get into medical school, you’re going to need a lot of experience and exposure in the field,” says Oppatt.

College Day was composed of college representatives and even Brashier alumni discussing frequently asked questions in regards to topics such as admissions, workload, and the transition from high school to the college life.

“Madison [Dudley] gave me a lot of advice because we were in a similar situation [in regards to free time and being/becoming an engineer major]… now I know I can do what I want and also have free time to do other things around campus that can hopefully improve my college experience,” says Weber.

Admissions became a key component of the sessions, especially for juniors who are at a crucial point of getting information about all things college.

“I felt like [College Day] was more beneficial for my future… especially now that I’m a junior and I’m applying to colleges soon,” says Oppatt.

Though it may have already seemed too late for seniors to learn anything new about college, some stood corrected.

“I know a lot of seniors didn’t show up [for College Day] because we’ve already applied and have been accepted to a couple of [colleges], but I came, which was good because there was something about Clemson that I didn’t know about, that will help me with my application,” states Weber.

Despite the mostly negative outlook of students on the event beforehand, it has seemingly transformed into a more positive yearning of the substitute.

“I think we should have College/Career day rather than Arts Intercession because it’s more beneficial to students,” states Oppatt.

However, some students still do prefer to have the good ol’ Arts Intercession as a start to the New Year and semester.

“I believe [that Arts Intercession] is the most beneficial approach to beginning the semester because it makes students… excited to start the New Year. It also encourages creativity and artistic endeavors that don’t get used too often,” says Jones.

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